Into the woods

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Little Scout was nervous at first, stepping gingerly through the underbrush on the way to the trees, holding tightly to my hand, and Ralph’s. “I am afraid of the sticks,” she said, “afraid that they might hurt me.” Once inside the pine-forest, she kept calling Ralph back. “Stay close little man! You might get lost!” Every step further into the forest added another layer of fear. She was positive we would all get lost. That there were monsters. Badgers (thank you, Peter Rabbit). A gruffalo.

And then Ralph found the first pine-cone. It was all broken and rotting on the under-side, so we threw it back, but it was enough. They raced around the clearing where we stood, Scout no longer afraid, leaping over the once-deadly sticks to find the best and most beautiful pine-cones. Ralph lead us further into the forest. “I am the exhibition leader!” he announced proudly. He meant expedition leader. “Ralph is a very good brother,” Scout said, and I agreed. “Lead on, Ralph,” I said, following him dutifully.

Above our heads and outside of the forest, a great wind was roaring. We saw it in the swaying canopy above us, heard it in the creaks and moans of the trees around us, and had felt it, before we stepped inside the trees, in the slap of dust and hair stinging our cheeks. But in here, everything felt calm. It was our own woody, pine-scented bubble.

We drank tea from enamel mugs, watched a kangaroo hop lazily past us and disappear over a hill. We raced one another in and out of rows of pine-trees, followed winding paths, scrambled up and down and over mossy logs and (unintentionally) through muddy puddles, and altogether had a wonderful time.

Even the mosquitoes that showed up for our picnic lunch couldn’t dampen our mood. “It’s a mozzie hunt!” the children shouted, slapping themselves wildly, and mostly ineffectually.

Then, “Time to find more pine-cones,” declared the expedition leader, but what he was really saying was, “Let the wild rumpus start!” So we packed up our picnic things and scrambled through the forest once more.

picnic

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

6 comments

  • Nancy

    you create a totally enchanting world! and I love reading about it. nancy king

  • Deb @ Blossom Bomb

    Oh that picture of Scout clutching her doll to her chest. Perfection. Beautiful pics, Naomi. LOVE.

  • Laura

    Oh what a sweet outing. So lovely. And now for a ridiculous question…is it typical to see a kangaroo in the woods? My guess is yes, since that detail was sort of nestled in among your text without fanfare, but me seeing a kangaroo in the woods here would be quite like you seeing an elephant in the woods there, so that bit got me pretty excited. :)

    • Naomi Bulger

      Haha your comment made me smile. Kangaroos are grazing animals so I guess they wouldn’t technically live in a pine forest, but we were quite close to the edge of the forest and there was lots of farmland and Australian bush nearby, so I imagine he was just passing through. Kangaroos are pretty common in Australia whenever you go outside the cities and suburbs. (Not like the way they’re presented on TV, hopping down the streets or anything, but still pretty common).

Leave a Comment

Theme by Blogmilk + Coded by Brandi Bernoskie